Austin Functional Nutrition 
                  Eat and Self Heal by Natural Design 

Mind Body Nutrition

Nutrigenomics

The scientific study of the interaction of nutrition and genes, especially with regard to the prevention or treatment of disease.
Why test genes?
Our genetic expression is strongly shaped by our environment… over which we do have some power. So, if we know more about our genetic variants, we might be able to adjust our lifestyle or environment in order to prevent some illnesses or become healthier.


For example, certain gene variants can tell us how food is metabolized.  Others can tell us whether or not carcinogens in cooked meats will influence the development of colon and prostate cancers. And others can predict inflammatory response and efficiency of DNA repair/replication.

If we know more about our own unique risk factors, we might be more likely to make healthier choices — choices that could improve our genetic expression.


Take celiac disease.  Some people can consume gluten (the protein composite found in many grains) without any problem. But when others eat gluten, it influences gene expression and sets off an inflammatory cascade in the gut.


Because gluten sensitivity symptoms are often somewhat vague, you might not know right away if you are gluten-intolerant. However, modern testing can reveal the gene variants that make certain people susceptible to celiac disease.

If you know your genetic makeup, and you know you carry the genes for gluten intolerance, it might help explain why you’ve been feeling ill… or might inspire you to change your diet before the inflammatory process becomes too advanced.




How genetic screening works

Genetic screening = testing + analysis.

Genetic testing can be performed via cheek swab, blood, or other tissue sampling. Any sample that contains human cell nuclei will work, since all cells have the same genes.  DNA is extracted from the sample, then amplified, sequenced, and assembled into a readable format for the patient.

Take celiac disease.  Some people can consume gluten (the protein composite found in many grains) without any problem. But when others eat gluten, it influences gene expression and sets off an inflammatory cascade in the gut.

Because gluten sensitivity symptoms are often somewhat vague, you might not know right away if you are gluten-intolerant. However, modern testing can reveal the gene variants that make certain people susceptible to celiac disease.

If you know your genetic makeup, and you know you carry the genes for gluten intolerance, it might help explain why you’ve been feeling ill… or might inspire you to change your diet before the inflammatory process becomes too advanced.